Archive for May, 2018

Icon Explorer – FreeFile Review

Icon Explorer is a program that enables the viewing, extraction, and saving of icons from programs(EXE and DLL) and from icon libraries (ICL). The program is for Windows only. It is portable; it requires no installation; just unzip and click to run.

To extract icons, navigate to the EXE or DLL within the Icon Explorer’s included Explorer panel. When all the icons contained in the EXE or DLL appear in Icon Explorer’s main window, you can save one or all icons by right-clicking. The icons can be saved as individual icons or as icon libraries.

What’s Good – The simplicity of the program. It has only a few settings to adjust (I found the defaults to be good), and an icon in the upper-right corner to choose one of five nice looking themes. The program does its job with a minimum of effort.

What’s Bad – I found nothing negative.

— — — — The Bottom Line — — — —

Obviously, Icon Explorer is a program that is used infrequently, even by power users, so the simplicity of it is clearly a good thing. Users who love tweaking their Windows PCs will be happy with Icon Explorer. Casual users can skip this program.

Download Icon Explorer HERE

Read more FreeFile Reviews at DanKostecki.com

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Meet Norway’s Modern-Day Vikings [video]

Most Powerful Photos Of Last Week – May 2018

BuzzFeed published these newsworthy photos.

The Professional Mourners of Arlington Cemetery

According to MentalFloss –

Hoyt Vandenberg, Chief of Staff for the United States Air Force, was driving to his office in the Pentagon in 1948 when he noticed a funeral being conducted at Virginia’s Arlington National Cemetery. There was no sea of crisp uniforms or sobbing family members. Aside from the chaplain and the Honor Guard, there was no one there at all. Vandenberg didn’t like it. Soldiers, he felt, deserved the presence of at least one civilian to bear witness to their burial. His wife, Gladys, agreed. She set about recruiting friends and wives of the enlisted to begin attending Air Force funerals, even though many of the deceased were complete strangers. They called themselves the Officers Wives Club and acted as both military representatives and as proxies for family members who might not be able to afford to travel to Arlington for services.

Continue reading HERE.

Farming Mozuku – Japan’s Seaweed Delicacy [video]

A Town Called Asbestos [video]

Photos of Hawaii’s Lava Flows

BuzzFeed published some stunning photos from Kilauea volcano’s current eruption.


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