Posts Tagged 'history'

A Brief History of OK [video]

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A Short History of The Commodore 64

According to MentalFloss –

Priced at $595 in September 1982, it quickly fell to $400, then $300, and eventually $190. Unlike most PCs of the era, the Commodore 64 could play games. Like the Model T, it didn’t have the sexiest aesthetic—the boxy keyboard housed its guts, while a separate monitor quickly crowded one’s workspace—but it was cheap enough to sell 500,000 units a month.

Continue reading HERE.

The First Underwater Film Is Stranger Than Fiction [video]

Outtake Photos from Apollo 11’s 1969 Moon Landing

According to Quartz –

The first human set foot on the moon 49 years ago on July 20, 1969, when Neil Armstrong emerged from the Apollo 11 lander. Along with the footage that was broadcast live on television, iconic images of the lunar expedition come from still photos the astronauts took themselves on a Hasselblad camera. The photos provide exceedingly crisp depictions of the lunar surface, the astronauts’ equipment and candid shots of the explorers themselves.

Included as well are less meticulously composed, almost accidental-looking images taken by the astronauts over the course of their mission.

Continue reading HERE.

John Turner’s Old Found Photos [video]

CNN posted a video about old found photos –

After sitting in a suitcase in an attic for almost 30 years, the newly-discovered photographs of amateur photographer John Turner offer a glimpse into life in pre and post-war Britain.

View the video HERE.

New Technique Restores Images of Old Damaged Daguerreotypes

According to TechCrunch –

Daguerreotypes – photos made with a process that used mercury vapors on an iodine-sensitized silvered plate – break down quite easily. The result is a fogged plate that, more often that not, is completely ruined by time and mistreatment. However, researchers at Western University have created a system that uses synchrotrons and “rapid-scanning micro-X-ray fluorescence imaging” to scan the plates for eight hours. The system shot an X-ray 10×10 microns thick at “an energy most sensitive to mercury absorption.” This, in turn, showed the researchers where the mercury is most prevalent, thereby bringing up the image that was lost to damage or decay.

Read more and watch a short video HERE.

Film From Shortly After The 1906 San Francisco Earthquake [video]


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