Posts Tagged 'optometry'

Victorians Worried About Books And Eyesight Like We Worry About iPhones And Eyesight

According to Popular Science –

From concerns over blue light to digital strain and dryness, headlines today often worry how smartphones and computer screens might be affecting the health of our eyes. But while the technology may be new, this concern certainly isn’t. Since Victorian times people have been concerned about how new innovations might damage eyesight.

Continue reading HERE.

Color Vision Test

paint-chips-sHere is a simple online test for color vision. I don’t know if it is accurate, or if the the science behind it is correct, but it only takes a few minutes and it is game-like. I got 27 with 0 errors, so I’m hawk eyed – beat that!

Take the test HERE.

Color Blind? These Lenses May Help

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Apparently, Encroma lenses are not a cure for color blindness, but for some individuals, they offer some help by enhancing colors.

From their site – With the EnChroma lens, colors appear brighter and more saturated. People report that their color discrimination is faster and more accurate, they are able to see more vibrant colors. They are more likely to notice objects that are differentiated against a background based on color (such as a flower against background of leaves), whereas without the lens those objects would have been overlooked.

Woman Sees 100 Times More Colors Than The Average Person

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From Popular Science –

When Concetta Antico looks at a leaf, she sees much more than just green. “Around the edge I’ll see orange or red or purple in the shadow; you might see dark green but I’ll see violet, turquoise, blue,” she said. “It’s like a mosaic of color.” Antico doesn’t just perceive these colors because she’s an artist who paints in the impressionist style. She’s also a tetrachromat, which means that she has more receptors in her eyes to absorb color. The difference lies in Antico’s cones, structures in the eyes that are calibrated to absorb particular wavelengths of light and transmit them to the brain. The average person has three cones, which enables him to see about one million colors. But Antico has four cones, so her eyes are capable of picking up dimensions and nuances of color—an estimated 100 million of them—that the average person cannot. “It’s shocking to me how little color people are seeing,” she said.

Continue reading HERE.

 


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