Posts Tagged 'neuroscience'

Scientist Find Reviving A Dead Brain Is Possible

According to NPR –

The brains of dead pigs have been somewhat revived by scientists hours after the animals were killed in a slaughterhouse. The Yale University research team is careful to say that none of the brains regained the kind of organized electrical activity associated with consciousness or awareness. Still, the experiment described Wednesday in the journal Nature showed that a surprising amount of cellular function was either preserved or restored.

Continue reading HERE.

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How Do Dolphins Sleep Without Drowning?

Bottlenose-sAccording to Mental_floss –

First of all, dolphins don’t sleep in one long chunk like humans or other mammals. Instead, they take 15 to 20 minute naps throughout the day and night. But the biggest factor in dolphin sleep is their brain doesn’t rest all at once like humans’ do. “Scientists have discovered that instead of ‘falling asleep’ and entering an unconscious state like humans, a dolphin rests one hemisphere of its brain at a time,” Belden explains. “So while one hemisphere is resting, the other is still active so that the dolphin can be sure to open its blowhole above the water.” Whichever brain hemisphere is active, the opposite eye will remain open. This is good for both swimming to the surface to breathe and for keeping a look out for predators. As Belden puts it, “Dolphins literally sleep with one eye open.” It’s impossible to know what sleeping with just half your brain at a time would feel like, and dolphins can’t exactly explain it to us. But Belden says that scientists speculate it might be sort of like daydreaming or meditating.

Seems quite reasonable. I know several people who can spend the entire day in such a state.

Continue reading HERE.

 

Too Much Light at Night at Night May Lead to Obesity

According to –

ScienceDaily (Oct. 11, 2010) Persistent exposure to light at night may lead to weight gain, even without changing physical activity or eating more food, according to new research in mice. Researchers found that mice exposed to a relatively dim light at night over eight weeks had a body mass gain that was about 50 percent more than other mice that lived in a standard light-dark cycle. “Although there were no differences in activity levels or daily consumption of food, the mice that lived with light at night were getting fatter than the others,” said Laura Fonken, lead author of the study and a doctoral student in neuroscience at Ohio State University.

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