Posts Tagged 'Massachusetts Institute of Technology'

Is This 23 Year-Old The Next Einstein?

According to secondnexus.com –

Harvard University believes the world’s next Einstein is among us — and she’s a millennial. At age 23, Sabrina Gonzalez Pasterski is already one of the most well-known and accomplished physicists in the U.S. The Cuban-American Chicago native graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in just three years with a 5.0-grade point average, the highest possible, and is currently a Ph.D. candidate at Harvard with full academic freedom — meaning she can pursue her own study on her own terms without staff interference.

Continue reading HERE.

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Motion Magnification – Seeing The Invisible [video]

Super Slippery Coating For Food Bottles

MIT has developed a food save coating intended for such things as bottles of condiments which supports the old adage that it is indeed ‘all about the little things’. Ketchup or mayo that doesn’t stick to the inside of the bottle, is not a game changer, but it is an idea that appeals to almost everyone. I wonder if this product will ever see production.

LiquiGlide, a “super slippery” coating made up of nontoxic materials that can be applied to all sorts of food packaging–though ketchup and mayonnaise bottles might just be the substance’s first targets. Condiments may sound like a narrow focus for a group of MIT engineers, but not when you consider the impact it could have on food waste and the packaging industry. “It’s funny: Everyone is always like, ‘Why bottles? What’s the big deal?’ But then you tell them the market for bottles–just the sauces alone is a $17 billion market,” Smith says. “And if all those bottles had our coating, we estimate that we could save about one million tons of food from being thrown out every year.”

Continue reading HERE and see it in action

 

Trillion Frames Per Second Camera Is Able To Capture Light Waves

According to BBC –

A camera capable of visualising the movement of light has been unveiled by a team of scientists in the US. The equipment captures images at a rate of roughly a trillion frames per second – or about 40 billion times faster than a UK television camera. Direct recording of light is impossible at that speed, so the camera takes millions of repeated scans to recreate each image. The team said the technique could be used to understand ultrafast processes. The process has been dubbed femto-photography and has been detailed on the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Media Lab’s website. “There’s nothing in the universe that looks fast to this camera,” said Andrea Velten, one of the researchers involved in the project.

Continue reading HERE or HERE

Video on YouTube HERE


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