Posts Tagged 'error'

Little Mistakes Can Mean A Lot

Cheezburger.com posted a list of 21 seemingly minor mess ups that led to huge problems. For instance, the Bay of Pigs invasion may have failed due to ignoring time zones.

Read explanations of all 21 HERE.

Many Errors In Scientific Papers Blamed On Excel’s AutoCorrect

NoExcel-small

According to Slate –

Excel is partially responsible for errors in 20 percent of scientific papers dealing with genes, according to a new study. In an effort to “raise awareness of the problem,” three scientists published findings that suggest one-fifth of all scientific papers about genes contain detrimental typos due to an Excel default setting that converts gene names to dates or numbers.

Continue reading HERE.

 

The Most Expensive Hyphen In History

Mariner1According to Priceonomics.com –

On July 22, 1962, at 9:20 PM, the Mariner I sat idly on its platform, ready to make history. After investing years of construction, calculation, and funding, NASA had high hopes that its rocket would successfully conduct a flyby survey of Venus, thus shifting the Space Race’s momentum back to the home front. In every way, it was poised to set a space travel precedent. But when the rocket embarked, it was clear there’d be no cause for celebration: less than 5 minutes into flight, Mariner I exploded, setting back the U.S. government $80 million ($630 million in 2014 dollars). The root cause for this disaster? A lone omitted hyphen, somewhere deep in hand-transcribed mathematical code.

Continue reading HERE.

 

Inexact CPU Makes Errors With Increased Efficiency

Rice University announced work on a computer chip that is intentionally not 100% accurate, that gains efficiency through these errors. Although, I can imagine some applications where this may be acceptable, but it seems to be a bad idea, in general.

Researchers have unveiled an “inexact” computer chip that challenges the industry’s 50-year pursuit of accuracy. The design improves power and resource efficiency by allowing for occasional errors. Prototypes unveiled this week at the ACM International Conference on Computing Frontiers in Cagliari, Italy, are at least 15 times more efficient than today’s technology.

The concept is deceptively simple: Slash power use by allowing processing components — like hardware for adding and multiplying numbers — to make a few mistakes. By cleverly managing the probability of errors and limiting which calculations produce errors, the designers have found they can simultaneously cut energy demands and dramatically boost performance. One example of the inexact design approach is “pruning,” or trimming away some of the rarely used portions of digital circuits on a microchip. Another innovation, “confined voltage scaling,” trades some performance gains by taking advantage of improvements in processing speed to further cut power demands. In their initial simulated tests in 2011, the researchers showed that pruning some sections of traditionally designed microchips could boost performance in three ways: The pruned chips were twice as fast, used half as much energy and were half the size. In the new study, the team delved deeper and implemented their ideas in the processing elements on a prototype silicon chip. “In the latest tests, we showed that pruning could cut energy demands 3.5 times with chips that deviated from the correct value by an average of 0.25 percent,” said study co-author Avinash Lingamneni, a Rice graduate student. “When we factored in size and speed gains, these chips were 7.5 times more efficient than regular chips. Chips that got wrong answers with a larger deviation of about 8 percent were up to 15 times more efficient.”

Continue reading HERE

 

10 Immutable Laws Of Mistakes

TechRepublic presents an excellent article that outlines mistakes and how they apply in the tech industry. These 10 laws are so universal that they apply to virtually any job and life in general.

Read the article HERE.

 

 


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