Posts Tagged 'engineering'

Explain Nothing – What Is Zero

According to Vox –

The computer you’re reading this article on right now runs on a binary — strings of zeros and ones. Without zero, modern electronics wouldn’t exist. Without zero, much of our modern world literally falls apart. Without zero, there’s no calculus, which means no modern engineering or automation.

Humanity’s discovery of zero was “a total game changer …

Continue reading HERE.

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How A Retractable Ballpoint Pen Works [video]

Engineers Use Origami To Develop Unusual Solutions [video]

origami-engineering

From Popular Science –

Hundreds of years ago, a marvel of modern engineering was born: origami, flat sheets of paper folded into lifelike forms. Today, mechanical engineers build on origami principles to make prototype machines that collapse, flex, or unfurl. With origami underpinning their core, spacecraft will harbor compact solar panels that expand dramatically after launch, and micro-scale instruments will unfold inside the body to perform delicate, minimally invasive surgery. A mechanical engineering lab at Brigham Young University, led by Larry Howell and Spencer Magleby, has been using origami as design inspiration for the better part of a decade. They created this video to trace the art form’s modern resurgence and share its wide application in engineering today.

Watch video HERE.

DIY Nuclear Fusion [video]

I Bet Homeland Security Wants This [video]

Einstein’s Refrigerator

According to Wired –

1930: Albert Einstein and fellow nuclear scientist Leo Szilard receive an American patent for a new kind of refrigerator that requires no electricity. The most famous physicist of the 20th century wasn’t a Thomas Edison: The fridge would prove to be one of Einstein’s few forays into the world of commonplace engineering. The refrigerator uses chemical reactions of ammonia, butane and water to turn a heat input into a cold output. Though the fridge never became a commercial product, Swedish company Electrolux did license the scientific duo’s most promising patents. And in recent years, some academics have built coolers based on the cycle Einstein and Szilard described. Beyond the desire to retrace Einstein’s footsteps, the refrigerator is intriguing because it doesn’t use freon or electricity, which could make it a cleaner, simpler alternative in poor countries. The only problem is that compared to a modern refrigerator, Einstein’s design isn’t very efficient at cooling per unit of energy input. The Oxford team, however, thinks it can quadruple the cooling output with some tweaks to the system.

Read the original post HERE


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