Posts Tagged 'computer'

Microsoft Windows Just Turned 30 – A Short History Of Everyone’s Favorite OS

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ZDnet published this short history of Windows – from its humble beginnings in 1985 to today.

ZDnet article HERE

BLITAB – A Tablet For Blind People

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From BLITAB’s site –

BLITAB is the world’s first tactile tablet for blind and visually impaired people. It is like an e-book, which instead of using a screen, displays small physical bubbles. They rise and fall on demand, as a result, one entire page can be read, or written via a Braille Perkins Keyboard. For the first time, readers can have an overview of an entire document.

They are currently accepting pre-orders. Go to BLITAB’s site.

Understanding the Blue Screen of Death (Infographic)

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ReviverSoft.com produced an infographic that gives basic information about the dreaded BSoD, the screen that completely baffles most Windows users. Now, it can be somewhat less mysterious.

Read the infographic HERE.

 

Steve Wozniak Talks About Apple’s Early Days [video]

I Like The New Print Magazine From CNet …But

CnetMag-sWhen I heard that CNet was to begin publishing a new print edition, I was both excited and dumbfounded. Excited because I was a big fan of computer magazines 10-15 years ago; most of those publications are no more. Dumbfounded because no one was dared to bring out a new computer magazine in years.

I bought the first issue and was immediately impressed that the magazine has much of the look and feel of Wired magazine (one of the few magazines I still receive). After reading the magazine, I was happy that the magazine was more technology/gadget focused than Wired. The new CNet magazine is a technology/gadget publication, not a computer magazine. Desktops are nowhere to be seen and laptops receive only scant mention. As it is 2014, phones get the bulk of coverage. There is also coverage of high tech motorcycles, smart homes, and battery technology to round things out. It is $6 at the news stand and will be published 4 times per year. Overall, I’m pleased with the magazine, and plan to subscribe, however, that brings me to the but.

… But

Who will support this publication? Sure, an old fart, like me, will pay $6 for a print copy, but how many younger folks will buy a magazine when they do their reading on their phones or tablets. CNet apparently is well aware of this, as the only subscription option I could find is for 2 issues. Yes, 2 issues – the current one and the next one. Way to instill confidence in your product! I guess I’ll just enjoy it while it exists.

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Where Can I Safely Download Free Software? FreeFile Review

FFR-WP-logoFWsites2014Downloading free software gets riskier everyday. Some sites intentional try to confuse people into downloading garbage by way of ads with large “Download” buttons. However, if you are careful, you can download the free programs that you want. This review is a comparison of the four best freeware download sites for Windows software, that I regularly visit. All four are quite similar, with only minor differences. Generally, these sites all have clean navigation (a minimum of ads with ‘Download’ buttons), are updated daily, offer a large catalog of software with reviews, ratings, and screenshots, and most importantly – a direct link to program that you want. Below are quick reviews of my four favorite sites.

SnapFiles is the best site for the occasional downloader. With very few ads and a clean lay-out, it is hard to go astray. Very good search function.

MajorGeeks has a clean, simple homepage, with the bulk of the page for the most recent software. The download pages for individual programs have ads with big green ‘Download Now’ buttons – so be careful. This site’s outstanding feature is mirror sites for downloads; frequently there are several sources for downloads. Use the links under “Download Locations”.

FileHorse, like MajorGeeks, junks up its download pages with ads. Use the green ‘Download Now’ button on the right side, labelled “(xx.xx MB) Safe & Secure”. Outstanding feature is old versions of most programs are available on the program’s download page.

Download Crew has the busiest, most ad-filled site. The download buttons are located directly under the program name on the download page. Best search function of the four sites.

– – – – The Bottom Line – – – –

All four of these sites offer only direct links to downloads, feature many new programs every day, and are relatively easy to navigate, so all of them are excellent. SnapFiles is the winner, by a nose.

Read more FreeFile Reviews at DanKostecki.com

 

Geekiest YouTube Channel – Classic Computer Viruses

Danooct1 may post the geekiest videos on all of YouTube. He infests vintage computers with old time viruses and records the ensuing mayhem. There are not just a few videos; there are literally, dozens and dozens of them. One word of warning –  you must be a real computer nerd to enjoy this stuff.

Danooct1’s YouTube channel

The Run Command – What Is It?

If you are like most Windows users, you never use the Run Command. The reason is that you don’t know what is does. MakeUseOf published a short article explaining the mysterious thing with some great tips on how to use it. Useful information for Windows users – impress you friends –

read the article HERE.

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Updates To Old Sayings [infographic]

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original source

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My Opinion – The Future of Freeware

FFR-WP-logomy-op1No review this time. Today, I’m presenting my opinion on how to improve the Windows freeware industry. I’m not a developer, just a user. In short, I propose saving the freeware business by destroying it ; charge a small amount ($.99 or $1.99), rather than giving it away. This is a successful model for phone apps and I believe that it could work for Windows software.

Why is this necessary?  Users love free stuff, but freeware developers need to be paid. In recent years, these two opposing positions have been satisfied by loading more and more crap into otherwise decent software. Users must tiptoe through a virtual minefield of “special offers” and spyware toolbars to install a simple utility. It is now common to see 2 or 3 pieces of crapware in the typical installer.

My solution – Remove all the garbage from the installers, offer the software with a short trial period and then charge a small license fee. Another possible solution could be subscriptions. When developers feel their work is worth more than $.99, charging $.99 per year may work. When the application is worthy, users are willing to pay a reasonable amount annually. Developers wanting the income stream to continue, will continue to improve the software. Everyone wins. Users get better software and developers get paid.

Will this happen? I doubt it. But, I want the developers to consider getting paid by their users, not the crapware marketers and being able to continue development on quality applications. This makes sense to me, but toolbars are so much easier.

If you have an opinion on the matter, or just think I’m full of it, you can leave a comment below.

Dan Kostecki

Read more FreeFile Reviews at DanKostecki.com

Apple’s New Big Mac [video]

New Android Keyboard Layout Makes Typing 1/3 Faster

According to BusinessInsider –

Smartphone and tablet typists are being urged to abandon the qwerty keyboard layout for a new design it’s claimed will make them more than a third faster. Researchers at the University of St Andrews have developed a keyboard for handheld touchscreens called KALQ that allows typing 34 per cent faster. It will be released as a free Android app.

Continue reading HERE

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