Archive for March, 2014



Pharmacist Prepares Anti-Monster Spray For 6-Year-Old

Monster_Under_the_Bed-sGizmodo reports –

While at the local Barrett Pharmacy & Variety, a little girl approached Dodds with a not-entirely-medical condition; all those monsters under her bed were keeping her up at night. And being the resourceful pharmacist that he is, Dodds decided to whip up a cure of his own concoction, ultimately producing the holy grail of frightened children everywhere—100% pharmacist-certified anti-monster spray.

Continue reading HERE.

Make Your Own Clothes Tazer-Proof

Taser-sHackaDay posted the simple instructions below. They seem  to be a lot more complicated in practice than in theory.

Make a cut at the bottom of the lining of your jacket or any clothes. Put a strip of iron-on no-sew hem tape, top with a strip of carbon tape. Press with an iron. Convenient to operate if cut small pieces of carbon tape and spread it inside his jacket, like a mosaic. Place the strips of carbon tape as close as possible to each other, to avoid gaps. Step by step, fill the entire area of your jacket with the carbon tape.

HackaDay’s post HERE

 

A Short History Of The PC Progress Bar

progbarThe New York Times reported –

“People wait for all sorts of things every day, sometimes more happily than others,” wrote the interface designer Bob Stahl in a 1986 article for Computerworld. “The problem is how the user feels about waiting.” At the time, machines were often slow and unreliable, and users didn’t always know when their programs crashed. A “progress bar” might mitigate frustration, Stahl suggested, by signaling that bits were flipping with a purpose somewhere deep inside the C.P.U.

The push to make computers more user-friendly gained momentum in the early 1980s. At a 1985 conference on the nascent field of computer-human interactions, a graduate student named Brad A. Myers presented a paper on the importance of what he called “percent-done progress indicators.” “I had the sense that they were useful and important, and not used as much as they should have been,” Myers says today. (He’s now on the faculty at Carnegie Mellon University.) He told his colleagues that progress bars made computer users less anxious and more efficient, and could even help them to “relax effectively” at work.

Continue reading HERE

Question Of The Day – Is Eating Boogers Good For You?

goo-sApparently not, according to Gizmodo –

Does physically taking boogers out of your nose, putting them in your mouth and swallowing boost your immune system? The short answer is probably not. You ingest your snot all the time without needing to channel it through your mouth. So if there is a benefit here, you get it without needing to munch your nose nuggets.

Continue reading HERE

So, What Will You Be Eating After The Apocalypse? [video]

The Love Of A Good Woman [comic]

original source

Lockhorns-3-5-14

1959 Curtiss-Wright Hover Car

aircar-sSucksqueezebangblow.co reports –

Developed by Curtiss-Wright in 1959, the Model 2500 Air Car wasn’t really a car at all, more a kind of family hovercraft. However, keen to tap into the increasingly extravagant and innovative motor car market of the era, they styled it to look like a car, with headlights, indicators, bumpers and a convertible roof. It was powered by a pair of 180hp Lycoming engines (one at the front and one at the back), driving lift fans that created a foot-tall cushion of air; propulsion came from bleeding air from the fan chambers and blasting it out of the louvres at the sides. Simple in construct, it was a pretty promising idea, were it not for the fact that it really only worked well on perfectly flat surfaces. The military took an interest for a while, but abandoned their own development program as untenable in 1961.

Continue reading and watch a video of the car HERE.

 

Sea Sapphire – The Most Beautiful Animal You’ve Never Seen

SeaSapphire-sLiveScience reports –

When I first saw a sea sapphire I thought I was hallucinating. The day had been anything but normal, but this part will always stand out. I had spent the afternoon on a small dingy off the coast of Durban, South Africa. It was muggy, and I had been working for hours – throwing a small net out, and pulling in tiny hauls of plankton to put in jars. As I looked through one jar, the boat rocking up and down, I saw a bright blue flash. It lasted for an instant and then it was gone. Then I saw another one in a different place. It was an incredible shade of blue. Maybe I had been in the sun too long? Maybe I was seeing things? It wasn’t until I got back to the lab that I discovered the true beauty and mystery of these radiant flashes.

Continue reading and watch video HERE.

 

 


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